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How is EEG neuromeditation different than traditional neurofeedback?

On the surface, these two practices look identical. You place electrodes on the scalp, measure brainwave activity, and provide the person with some form of feedback about what is happening in their brain. Auditory (sound) feedback is generally a specific tone or music that happens when the brainwave patterns shift to the desired state. Visual […]

Written by Editor
December 16th, 2019

On the surface, these two practices look identical. You place electrodes on the scalp, measure brainwave activity, and provide the person with some form of feedback about what is happening in their brain. Auditory (sound) feedback is generally a specific tone or music that happens when the brainwave patterns shift to the desired state. Visual feedback can be on a flat screen or in virtual reality/augmented reality with Healium. Visual feedback typically involves something changing in the visual experience in response to the brainwave patterns. For example, the screen might dim when you are not in the desired brainwave state and it might become brighter when you are in the desired state. Both traditional neurofeedback and EEG NeuroMeditation use these forms of feedback; however, the function and form of the client’s experience for each of these is quite different.

In traditional neurofeedback, the goal is generally to help shift the brain out of undesirable pattern. For example, someone with ADHD may have an excessive amount of theta brainwave activity in a specific region of the brain. The neurofeedback therapist would place sensors in that exact region and “reward” the person whenever the theta activity drops below a certain level. This is a very individualized process designed to help a person’s brain learn how to move out of its typical, stuck pattern of behaving.

In EEG neuromeditation, the neurofeedback parameters are pre-determined. It is not individualized. We know how the brain should be responding during specific meditation states, so the neurofeedback becomes a tool to help someone identify if and when they are able to enter those states and when they shift into mind-wandering or some other “undesirable” state. It is not about trying to make the brain change a potentially problematic pattern. It is about helping someone to understand their internal state. The neurofeedback, in this case, serves as meditation “training wheels.”

Written by Editor
December 16th, 2019